Bricking  –  The number one reason not to root your device is the potential risk of “bricking” it. As mentioned earlier, “bricking” your device means screwing up your phone software so badly that your phone can no longer function properly and is pretty much as useless as a brick. You would likely need to purchase a new Android device since the manufacturer of your device will void the warranty after any attempts at rooting.

Security  –  There is an increased risk of unknowingly installing malicious software when you root an Android device. Root access circumvents the security restrictions that are put in place by the Android OS. There isn’t really an effective way to tell just what the application intends to do with that “superuser” power. You are putting a lot of trust into the developer’s hands. In most cases, these applications are open source and the community can take a look at the source code to assess the risk. But, nevertheless, the risk is there. Fortunately, malicious software on rooted devices hasn’t really been a problem as of yet. But I thought it was worth mentioning since this could be a potential risk in the future. I’d recommend installing an Anti-Virus and Security App just to be safe. Lookout Mobile Securityseems to be one of the best available at the moment.

Can I Unroot my device if I change my mind?  –  Yes. You would need to do some research for your specific type of device. As mentioned earlier, the XDA Developer Forums is the best place to start.

How do I learn how to root my device?  –  Unfortunately, there is no easy way to teach someone how to root their Android device. Each device has a unique method to rooting and some research most be done on your part. As mentioned earlier, the best place to start would be the XDA Developer Forums.  Another option is to simply Google the model of your  phone and the term root (ex. “HTC EVO root”). Have fun and good luck to all of you!

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